THE DIRECTOR'S TAKE

Steven Reames has been the executive director of Ada County Medical Society since 2014. He has served in a variety of non-profit leadership roles in Boise since 2000.

In his monthly blog for ACMS, he writes about personal reflections as he sees it from his chair in the Boise area medical community.

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  • 05/31/2019 3:30 PM | Anonymous


    Suicide, Confidentiality, and Getting Help

    Nobody really wants to have to talk about it because it is uncomfortable, but the facts remain: physicians kill themselves at higher rates than the average population. This has been proven through studies in the US that date back 4 decades and was even cited in the mid 1800’s in the UK. Many people recite the generally accepted estimate that about 300-400 physicians die by suicide each year – “an average medical school size” – but most do not know that the figure comes from a 1977 study published in JAMA.

    Idaho is not immune to this, which is why ACMS Foundation applied for and received a grant from the St. Luke’s Community Health Improvement fund this year. With these funds, we will be able to train upwards of 400 local physicians, NPs, PAs, residents, administrators and medical students through a series of QPR trainings.

    We are contracting with The Speedy Foundation to provide the Question, Persuade, Refer gatekeeper training. Like CPR, the material can be taught to anybody in a relatively short period of time to know how to look for warning signs of suicidality, ask the difficult question directly, offer hope, and where to refer people. The Speedy Foundation is named after Boise Olympic medalist Jeret Petersen, who battled depression and substance abuse and took his life in 2011 at the age of 29.

    This month, ACMS brought the first training to St. Luke’s Elmore with about 14 in attendance, covering a huge swath of their medical staff. We plan to have at least four more sessions, with two already scheduled for first and second year classes of the Idaho College of Osteopathic Medicine. The training is useful for opening conversations with colleagues, patients, family members and friends. We are working to make at least one of these open to independent ACMS members.

    As we have planned and implemented this training, some of the discussions I’ve been part of highlight the difficulty in asking this question of medical colleagues, knowing where to refer them appropriately, and some of the real reasons why physicians are reluctant seek help. Among many physicians, there is still some very deep skepticism and cynicism when it comes to looking for help. They still feel that their privacy, reputation, licensure, and means of making a living might be at stake should somebody find out the level of their pain.

    These are tough issues to address, tender points among high performers who have seen some well-intentioned efforts go awry. But avoiding them doesn’t make them go away and our hope is that by talking about it more and more, we can foster a more trustworthy and supportive culture in medicine so that physicians can tend to the inherent emotional challenges of their work.

    This sensitivity around confidentiality is part of the reason why ACMS chose, when starting its Physician Vitality Program (PVP), not to have any record or knowledge of the members who participate. We built the counseling program around maximum confidentiality whereby:

    • physicians make their own appointments directly with counselors;
    • compulsory participation is not allowed;
    • physicians receive no diagnoses from counselors;
    • no insurance is billed;
    • no electronic health record is created;
    • and limited paper records are kept by counselors only as much is needed for progress notes to protect their licenses.

    The only thing ACMS ever gets back is billing with demographic reporting (member type, career stage, gender, employment status, specialty, and types of challenges presented). If participants are concerned that the unique combination of these data points would identify them, they can say “other” to mask themselves. We're glad to have added a couple more contractors in Boise this month to our pool and intend to get one in Elmore County, which is part of our membership territory.

    More information about Physician Vitality Program

    If you are interested in hosting a QPR training at your practice or facility, please let me know.

    Citations

    The High Rate of Physician Suicide

    Preventing Physician Suicide (1977)

    Medscape's 2018 Article on Suicide


  • 04/30/2019 4:44 PM | Anonymous

    As we prepare to publish our membership directory, we have finalized our 2019 membership numbers and I felt it would be a good time to reflect on the trends.

    Overall membership

    Total ACMS membership climbed to just over 2000 for the first time in our history and this was due in large part to the addition of the first medical student class of the Idaho College of Osteopathic Medicine. ACMS represents 60% of the Idaho Medical Association’s total membership and 55% of its physician members.

    • The total number of ACMS physician members grew by 4.7% from the prior year. Disappointingly, in spite of overall population growth in Ada County, the total number of active physician licenses here (regardless of member status) appears to be an absolute flatline from 2018.
    • Our market saturation of licensed physicians who are physicians jumped from 69 to 72%.
    • The percentage of students out of our entire membership increased from 4% to 11%. As each successive class of ICOM medical students comes into town, we can anticipate this will skew overall membership numbers.

    Employment Status

    Exactly half of the 1091 actively practicing member physicians (not retirees or residents) are connected to a hospital system as employer or clinic owner. This represents virtually no change from the prior year in real numbers or percentage.

    • However, the number of physicians from independent large practices, defined as 8 or more, jumped up 76 from 25% to 31% of members.
    • Unfortunately, we also lost 31 independent solo practitioners dropping to just 10% of our member physicians.

    Gender and Career Stage

    In keeping with nationwide trends, the ranks of female physicians continue to grow, up a couple points over the prior year, and now representing 34% of member doctors.

    • Early career doctors (under age 43) also made gains on overall representation in the membership.

    Specialties

    The percent of ACMS’ actively practicing members in various specialties is closely representative of the 2017 AMA Master File. The only specialties locally that show more than a percentage point variance is Family Medicine (+6% in Boise), Emergency Medicine (+4%), Pediatrics (+3%) and Psychiatry (-2%).


    As I reflect very briefly on these trends, my thoughts are:

    • It appears that the number of active late career physicians took steep dives: among men age 58-84, more than 30% left active practice in Ada County this past year along with 20% of late career female physicians.
    • We need to continue to work hard to keep our older physician population working, even if only part-time. As Boise’s population grows, the last thing we need is a mass exodus of physicians fed up by bureaucratic systems, endless amount of EHR clicking, and practices that exceed their ability to absorb change. This may means providing greater assists to older physicians who are slowing down, but still have a great deal of wisdom, knowledge, experience and mentoring to offer.
    • Our independent physician groups provide a robust counterpoint to an industry that has grown so consolidated. I have said it for four years now, citing the book The Spider and the Starfish. Nearly every American industry has seen waves of consolidation and deconsolidation: airlines, media, telecom, automobile makers…and healthcare is just now experiencing the same. Eventually the pendulum will swing back and our medical society should anticipate those changes by helping both employed and independent minded physicians to practice where they feel best suited.
    • With an increasing number of medical students coming down the pipeline, we need to continue to think about how to better introduce organized medicine to this population and how we can serve both WWAMI and ICOM.
    • Helping connect the docs with each other in a membership of this size will remain an important goal of the medical society to build collegiality and bust up silos. We will need to diversify our events to include the large scale activities like Go Wild at Zoo Boise and Winter Garden Aglow, medium size events like our Physician Vitality Series and Annual Meeting, and our micro events, like Beers with Peers and affinity groups.

    Thank you for your membership this year and being part of a vibrant local medical society.


  • 03/29/2019 10:50 AM | Anonymous


    Whenever I have gotten the opportunity to eat a gourmet meal and the $35 dish is brought to me with only 50% of it covered in food, I start to feel ripped off. “Where is my $12, overloaded all-you-can-eat, Chuck-a-Rama filled-up plate?”

    And then I taste what is artfully prepared and presented and remember the meaning of “less is more.”

    I was sharing with a friend recently about the similar temptation to fill my life up to the brim, where I leave no margins for rest and replenishment. I cut out the white space of my schedule, always thinking that more is better and I want to have options, a little bit of this, a little bit of that. Invariably I get to the overfull, post-buffet feeling of, “I regret that I ate everything I put on my plate.”

    Moreover, even though my job is entirely about serving our members, sometimes I feel like I am wasting time when I spend effort being relational rather than punching off tasks. I flashback to what my college pastor and mentor told me, “Steve, you are already efficient with tasks, but you need to become more effective with people.”

    Ouch. It still hurts.

    I know this is not just a personal problem. All too often, our very national culture of productivity and high-output becomes a gluttony for activity and turns towards an addiction to stimulation. Never is this truer than in medicine, where the trend is to try and squeeze every ounce of value out of increasing healthcare costs. But Princess Leia’s defiance certainly applies here: “The more you tighten your grip, the more star systems will sleep through your fingers.” We are becoming less effective with patients and struggle to remain efficient with tasks because there are just too many to hold on to.

    Somehow, we must learn to build margins and rest both into our personal and corporate lives, even if it makes us feel guilty for being unproductive and inefficient. As they attempt to move towards “zero-harm,” healthcare employers and leaders must stop thinking about their organizations as 99.9999% uptime machines and start thinking of them as living systems built of human beings which cannot operate effectively OR efficiently 99% of the time.

    I believe as we recover this flavor of our humanity, the quality of what and how we serve patients will leave them more satisfied and healthier than trying to offer everything imaginable.


  • 02/28/2019 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    For me, Winter Clinics is a mixture of extreme logistical output and a cathartic soaking up of gratitude. It is the culmination of many months of work, putting together speakers, travel arrangements, food choices, graphics and design work, securing sponsors and exhibitors, CME paperwork, videoconferencing arrangements, registering attendees…and making it all look like a well-oiled machine.

    So as the event begins and wears on and there are inevitably things I want to fix or change, overall it is a weekend filled with various people being quite grateful. This is a moment that I purposefully slow down, listen to what is working and appreciated, and glow in the bask, sucking it in as potential energy for future event planning. When recognized amidst a crowd, I will sometimes even do a small bow, tipping my imaginary hat as if to say, "You're welcome. It has been my pleasure."

    And it really is. For those of us gifted in hospitality and event planning, it turns our crank to put the gift of a conference, a dinner or a social all together and watch others unwrap it. I won't apologize for the satisfaction that comes from performing my job well.

    And neither should you.

    When Dr. Dike Drummond, author of thehappymd.com blog, spoke to us in Boise last May, he talked about moments like these in the exam room. He emphasized how important it is when a patient or their family members begins to thank you for your care that doctors need to stop, turn and give them your full attention, listen closely, and breathe the affirmation in deeply. It's like sitting in the warmth of the sun.

    This is why you went to medical school, muddled half-awake through residency, and sometimes skip your kids' soccer games. It was to care for people and be a healing presence in their lives. If you aren't paying attention amidst everything you have to do, it is too easy to let those thank yous go to waste. In fact, some of us have the awful habit of blushing in self-deprecation and saying, "Oh, it was nothing (de nada)" when it really was something huge for them.

    In fact, when we slow down, we might actually create more relational space to allow for more gratitude from others. My bad habit is wandering through a room of people with an "I'm too busy to engage with you" look on my face (and sometimes I am.) But when I slow down to prioritize relationships over tasks, it makes my job so much more meaningful than just punching things down. I know this is difficult when you still have to punch those things down, but it can make the extra time spent later so much more worth it.

    Having interacted with many of you, I can see how much effort you put into your work so may I be the first (but not the last) to say, "Well done. Thank you for all you do."


  • 01/31/2019 1:45 PM | Anonymous


    At our annual R2 Unit training yesterday, our keynote speaker shared about Practicing Courageous Leadership. Erica Davis is Program Manager for Organizational Design and Provider Engagement for St. Luke's Health System. During this half-day occupational readiness training for about 30 program year two residents (drawn from three local and two East Idaho residencies), Erica talked about some of the core competencies of what leaders do and how they behave.

    It is a talk I wish all of our members could hear. She started by asking how many of the residents thought of themselves as leaders and was happily surprised by about ¾ of the room indicating yes. She said this was unusually high and that most physicians she talks with don't see themselves that way unless they hold an official leadership post.

    She said, one of the things that are true about all leaders is that they help navigate change. To understand this, we might think of this breaking down into at least three skills:

    1) Can you envision a future that is different than the present? Many doctors – read 'scientists trained in science and evidence-based medicine' - have given up on honing their creative and imagination skills, so this is often an area where they get stuck.

    2) Can you paint a picture of that future in terms that captures the hearts and minds of others, or at the very least, your own? It is not enough to complain about the present: leadership requires the ability to put some specifics about where you want to go into words or pictures that motivate

    3) Can you help people identify and get over obstacles moving towards that future? These obstacles might include internal and external objections to change and you may need to help redesign systems and environments to support attitudinal and behavioral change.

    As a physician, you could find yourself leading in one or more of these realms beginning with:

    1) Yourself! Internal motivation, setting goals, and self-discipline – you all have this in you if you made it through medical school and residency. Although Erica has the official title of "program manager" for provider engagement, the fact is all physicians need to take on this title as it relates to themselves.

    2) Patients. Is not enough to have the medical knowledge of what is wrong with a person's health or even what the solution is. You also must learn the skills of empathy, motivational interviewing, and behavioral change management.

    3) Teams. Unless you are the only individual in your office, you have a team to lead. This means growing in your knowledge of group dynamics, conflict resolution, encouraging people, and measuring progress.

    4) Organization. Whether it is your own small business or you are responsible for an entire department, you have to get stronger in communication, quality control, budgeting, environmental scanning and systems change management.

    5) Culture. This is by far the hardest to bring leadership to because it involves helping shape the way people think before they change their behavior. But it also has the greatest potential for long-term transformation and something that physicians should not shrink back from.

    Although some are born with a greater leadership inclination than others, these are skills you can learn. Erica's talk leaned heavily on social scientist, Brené Brown, who pretty much owns the global market on the topic of vulnerability. Any of her books are a great start in "Daring to Lead" and I hope you will dare yourself to do just that.


  • 12/31/2018 11:32 AM | Anonymous


    I have often been identified by people as being a physician, to which I generally respond saying, "Well, I'm not a physician, but I've played one on TV." At that point, I can tell if they grew up watching Marcus Welby MD or not. Regardless, I am like many physicians who are often prone to jumping very quickly into diagnostician mode whenever they see a problem: mentally you run through symptoms and observations, identifying potential solutions and make your assessment. Then you define a treatment that has the best chance at success. Take two and call me in the morning, right?

    But, in recent years many physicians are learning how to more fully involve their patients in decision making and finding it is a more powerful form of practicing medicine. This is especially true when a patient needs to make lifestyle changes that will enhance their health. Setting aside your differential diagnostician and voice of authority and eliciting their personal motivations and goals can be a challenge for many physicians (and certainly isn't appropriate for every situation.)

    So you might understand ACMS' challenge in facilitating a collaborative process that has many stakeholders and interested parties affected. Right now, I am just getting started on building a "Capital Coalition for Physician Well-being." We are at a place in our medical community where the collaborative intent around shaping a better healthcare culture is very high.

    But this isn't just as easy as saying, "What's the problem? What are potential solutions? Let's get to work." Collaborative problem solving is much more complicated, needing a high degree of trust and patience as each party shares their perspectives, negotiates towards agreed upon solutions, and then gets to work, each on their own and in parallel with the others.

    In our situation, this is further complicated by the fact that ACMS has no control over what participating physician groups or health systems may choose to accept or reject as potential solutions. I am not the fallback CEO who says "you all will do this if we can't agree to a plan of action." It is either completely collaborative, or nothing moves forward.

    I do have high hopes, however, mostly because of what I've seen emerge out of partnerships over the past 3 years as well as who I've seen emerge. Physician leaders from many different levels of health systems, educational institutions and solo practices are ready to roll up their sleeves and say, "Not just for my workplace, but for the good of all the doctors in town we're ready to get to work, together!"

    With that, we start 2019 with great anticipation of what is possible, not because it is easy, but because of the hearts of those who care for their colleagues in this noble profession.

  • 11/30/2018 10:56 AM | Anonymous


    I know some doctors who have never learned to establish good boundaries in their lives. By that I mean, they really don't know how to say "no." This is not entirely their fault: the medical education process teaches not only the applied practice of medicine but also the fortitude to be able to go beyond what is comfortable. And that involves a lot of boundary violations.

    So, it is no surprise that after residency, many physicians never really learn how to take back control of their life and save some white space for themselves. It can be a mental, and even spiritual, exercise to work through the difference of "the patient always comes first" and the need for your own rest, rejuvenation, and personal life away from medicine.

    Here are a few thoughts on creating some healthy borders in your life for your own longevity's sake:

    1. Give yourself permission to set boundaries. The practice of medicine will consume every inch of ground in your life that you don't reserve for other purposes.  It does not help that your education and enculturation will tell you that is normal. But it is your right to decide how much you’re going to give. You must choose when you are going to be generous, otherwise, it is too easy to feel resentful for giving more than you wanted to.

    2. Know your values. It is crucial for you to know in your life what is inviolable except under the most extreme circumstances. Is it your running therapy? Weekend worship? Family vacations? Personal space? Only you can say what you need to protect and what you can afford to be squishy on.

    3. Create structure.  Sloppy boundaries invite incursion. I remember a time when my wife was pregnant before we had a fence built and the neighbor boy would practice his ball bouncing skills against the outside wall of our bedroom. Not only did we tell him not to do this, eventually we built a fence. Structure in your work and family life helps reinforce boundaries you have established.

    4. Communicate your limits clearly and proactively. The Great Wall of China was a pretty effective sign saying, "thus far and no more." Same thing with razor-topped fences around U.S. military facilities. If you have not yet communicated to others what your boundaries are, then you cannot assume they are going to respect them.

    5. Prepare for violations. You can bet that every civilized nation has a plan for what happens if their neighbor crosses into their territory, be it land, air or sea space. People will push your limits, intentionally or otherwise, and you need to become adept as a physician at how you will respond. It does not have to be harsh, rude, or violent – it just needs to be clear and firm.

    6. Pay attention to your feelings. Guilt, resentment, anger, lashing out at others: these are all red flags that something has been violated, sometimes unspoken or unarticulated even to yourself. What kind of warning signs tell you when somebody has crossed a perimeter that you have established?

    7. Bring up boundary violations quickly. It is not effective to tell somebody that they violated your boundary six months ago. A perfectly acceptable response in the moment –  and an example of training others what your limits are – might sound like, "No, I am sorry.  I will not call in that prescription because I am not the doctor on call. Please call Dr. Jones instead." The problem with saying, "just this once" is that it never seems to end that way.

    8. Practice saying "no." It is so difficult for most of us to feel like we are letting others down and there are certainly times in your calling when you will have to say "yes" even though you don't want to. That is fine and none of us get this perfect. This is more reason why you must practice saying "no" to things you really can deny.

    ​When doctors unlearn some of the "brainwashing" they underwent early on, it helps create a more sustainable life of service to others.


  • 10/31/2018 3:10 PM | Anonymous


    St. Luke's Treasure Valley VP Medical Affairs Dr. Frank Johnson and Saint Alphonsus Physician Resilience Medical Director Dr. Sheila Giffen, during a joint Peer-to-Peer training session.

    by Steven Reames

    Let's look at some of our local health institutions' mission and purpose statements starting with the shortest:

    • Saltzer Medical Group: "To serve our patients in a manner worthy of their trust."
    • St. Luke's Health System: "To improve the health of people in the communities we serve."
    • Primary Health Medical Group: "Committed to providing our patients with the highest quality care that is both convenient and comprehensive.
    • Saint Alphonsus Health System: "We serve together in the spirit of the Gospel as a compassionate and transforming healing presence within our communities."
    • Family Medicine Health Center: "Train outstanding broad-spectrum family medicine physicians to work in underserved and rural areas.  Serve the vulnerable populations in Idaho with high quality, affordable care provided in a collaborative work environment."
    • Idaho Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: "To improve the lives of the functionally impaired. IPMR strives to provide a working environment that enhances the potential of its employees by encouraging mutual respect, job satisfaction, professional development and positive interpersonal relationships."
     
    Some of these are short and directly to the point; others make an effort not just to talk about their purpose, but also some of the values and modus operandi important to them.
     
    I also reflect on our own mission statement from time to time, which frankly looks like 75% of other general medical societies who modeled there's after the AMA's:
    "The purposes of this Society are to promote the science and art of medicine, the protection of the public health, the betterment of the medical profession and to unite with similar organizations in other counties of the State of Idaho to form the Idaho Medical Association."
     
    What is different about it than most healthcare organizations is the last phrase about "uniting with similar organizations" as a goal, not just a mode of operation. While it may be unique to being a "component society" of the state medical association, I also think there's an attitude of collaboration there that truly defines how we think here in the Treasure Valley.
     
    To truly fulfill our missions, we must join with other like-minded people and organizations.
     
    In fact, I wonder how it would change our healthcare institutions if they all added "with the greater medical community" to their mission statements and acted on it.
     
    This fall, Mayo Clinic's Colin West, MD, MPH, a leading researcher on physician burnout, spoke in Boise at two separate back-to-back events. In the first, he very subtly threw down the gauntlet to physicians and administrators saying:
     
    "I really believe that there's a gap that can be filled by those first adopter groups that actually reveal a competitive advantage when they successfully attack these issues (around physician burnout) … Nobody in the country is thinking about it that way systematically. So, there's a gap there and if somebody jumps into that breach, they're going to reap the benefit of that."*
     
    Two days later, he led a workshop on actionable next steps physicians can take towards enhancing their workplaces. One of our hospital system execs stood up and threw down his own gauntlet saying, "I think we need to stake a claim that Idaho is NOT going to be the 50th state in provider wellness." (He was referring to Medscape's 2018 report that ranks Idaho #1 in physician burnout.)
     
    These conversations raise the possibility from trying to address clinician distress at the micro level and aiming instead at the macro factors that drive it, and not just at the employer's level. To this end, ACMS is now gearing up to charter a coalition that would focus efforts across the medical community on tackling the largest contributors to burnout. We believe that by shooting at the same target together, we have a better chance at reshaping our community's medical culture in a way that supports the vitality of our caregivers for generations to come.
     
    Stay tuned.
  • 09/28/2018 3:25 PM | Test File Reames


    Not that long ago, one of the most creative entrepreneurs I know asked me, "What is a win for Ada County Medical Society?"

    It was an outcome driven question that challenges lifetime non-profit leaders like me. We tend to be all squishy on data-driven metrics and balk at having to prove our value to our constituents. Sitting around a campfire and singing "kumbaya" actually isn't a bad idea to us.

    However, as I reflect on what we truly aim to accomplish and the type of leaders we tend to attract to the board, there is something to be said about campfires. Our value statement is "We Connect the Docs of Ada and Elmore Counties." While we do have a longer formal mission statement (that looks just about like every other county medical society's), relationships are at the heart of our activities and efforts.

    This board has prioritized the building of collegial relationships in our programming and making lots of time for doctors to get to know each other. In fact, at our annual meeting in October, we will be recognizing one of our local heroes as the ACMS Physician of the Year, due in part to his gregarious nature of tending to other physicians and helping lead ACMS in this direction during his board tenure this decade. If you've been to any of our events, Dr. Kyle Palmer, a newly retired orthopedist, has undoubtedly shook your hand and made you feel welcome. 

    While many associations keep scoreboards for membership totals, peer reviewed publication readers, legislative victories or even the more ethereal "member engagement," I personally am most gratified by when I see doctors connecting.

    • It's a win every time ACMS gets to introduce doctors to each other who might provide value in terms of referral patterns, expertise, or mentoring.
    • It's a win cutting a check to our contract counselors for sessions through the Physician Vitality Program.
    • It's a win for doctors to push aside their laptop and look into their patients’ eyes, even when they know it means pajama time documentation.
    • It’s a win for doctors to connect their hearts with their hands through a medical volunteer opportunity they took advantage of.
    • It’s a win after hearing a physician tell me they cut their medical school debt in half because of financial services we referred them to.
    • It’s a win watching a doctor put a hand on another’s shoulder at an event and ask how they’re doing… “No, this is a mental heath check. Really, how are you doing?”


    If you are feeling disconnected, I encourage you to take advantage of the three upcoming events ACMS will have this fall: Legislative Night Update, the Annual Meeting/BBQ Dinner, and Winter Garden Aglow. And if big events aren't your thing, give me a call and we’ll go have breakfast, lunch or coffee together instead.


    Graphic by Freepik

  • 08/31/2018 1:45 PM | Anonymous

    Picture

    As the Treasure Valley continues to grow at dizzying rates and more newcomers show up in our fair city, many are concerned about sustainability. How do we meet the increasing demands placed on all sorts of infrastructure: roads, schools, housing, and healthcare? If people are leaving "crazy-town" and coming to a slower paced and "nicer" place, how do we make sure they don't bring crazy with them? How do we help enculturate people to the area's values and heritage that make it special?

    These are certainly questions that many communities face whenever there is a migratory influx. There may be plenty of "Welcome Refugees" bumper stickers emblazoned on tailgates, referring to foreigners fleeing violence and persecution. But on the other side of the bumper you might see it qualified by "Except Those Driving Up Housing Prices."

    Speaking of driving, it reminds me of an ad that appeared years ago in my alma mater's alumni newsletter. It had a picture of a steering wheel and instead of the typical trumpet on the horn button, there was an icon of a man bent slightly at the waist, gesturing for somebody to go first. The headline said something to the effect of, "If everybody was a Cougar, perhaps our horns would announce, 'No please, after you.'" It's the kind of message I wish could be given to every new driver seeking an Idaho license.

    It causes me to think about what kind of messaging and onboarding could or should happen with physicians coming to settle in Idaho. ACMS' membership has grown by 36% over the past six years, from 1229 members to 1766, mostly migratory and settling into large groups or hospital systems. That kind of rapid growth can quickly dilute important values – I've seen it happen when our charter school added 40% new seats one year. While I'm not a physician, here are a few pieces of the local medical zeitgeist I suggest we might want to project and protect:
     
    Independence is Still Alive and Well
    Part of the Mountain West states' pioneer ethic is a strong libertarianism, which believes in only minimal state intervention in the lives of citizens. While Boise itself leans politically towards a more moderate progressivism, statewide, these two tensions manifest themselves in many areas including healthcare. Whereas other large markets have almost entirely absorbed solo and independent practices, in the Treasure Valley there remains a thriving independent physician movement representing about half of all ACMS members.
     
    Collaboration is King
    Thankfully, the 2012-13 anti-trust lawsuit against St. Luke's Health System by Saint Alphonsus, the FTC and Idaho's Attorney General's did not put an end to the long-standing collaborative spirit in local healthcare. The frontier attitude of "we're all in this together" is slowly reemerging from the shadows in demonstrable grassroots ways between various departments and initiatives. For those arriving from cutthroat medical markets, it is important to help them understand what “Boise Nice" means and to assert that collaborative-competition ("co-orpative") is a viable alternative.
     
    Community Involvement 
    Some of the primary reasons people move to our city are to take advantage of nearby recreational opportunities, the family-friendly vibe, and relative affordability. Welcoming a new physician to town can include introducing them to your favorite non-profit or medical association, inviting them to help coach a kid's sports team, showing them the best biking trails, or tipping them off to the best craft beers or local wineries.
     
    Self-Care: An Ethical Duty
    This value may be more aspirational than the others, but there is a growing and emerging trend of tending to your own sustainability as a physician. The research is clear on this point: the better you take care of your own physical and mental health, the better prepared you are to give high-quality care to your patients. You can help acclimate new colleagues encouraging them to practice their humanity first and medicine second so that when they bump up against the inevitable occupational challenges of medicine, there's plenty of cushion to absorb it. 

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Director: Steven Reames, director@adamedicalsociety.org  (208) 336-2930
Membership Assistant: Jennifer Hawkins, jennifer@idmed.org (208) 344-7888
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